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  #1  
Old 10-05-2018, 02:41 PM
Johndeere Johndeere is offline
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Default I need to upgrade my digital processing

I knew this day would come. My current pc has been limping along for over a year. It is a HP which I will flat out tell you to never ever support this company. For me personally I have had nothing but problems when it comes to their computers. Their printers have been ok but there is no way I will include their computers in my search to update.

So first I need to decide on a operating system. Do I got Windows or Mac?

Second do I got desk top or lap top?

Third I need to decide on a screen size that will maximize my efforts.

So as you can see I have work to do for what I call the main building block of my digital processing. I hope to bring you along with my trip as I pick my operating system.

The next step is I finally have to decide on the actual post processing software I will use. We all know what is out there. However I have to pick one that makes sense to me. It has to first be easy, second it has to be fast and third it must generate results that I want. I suspect this will take a lot of homework to find the best solution for me.

Next I need some kind of organization program.

Then I need to add scanning solutions for my film. This I already know I want he best I can afford. However again it is going to take a lot of research.

Last on my list is printing. This will not be an easy task. I don't print a lot of my own photos but when I do it is important to me to have the best. So do I spend money on something that I will use infrequently but ranks as the most important part of my digital system.

Currently I am using a HP desk top. While it is three years old it was the worst purchase in ever made. I use a Epson ink jet and a HP laser which are a little dated but I am happy with.

My Epson flatbed does ok but at 10 years old is dated.

I use the last free standing pre cloud version of PS. It's great but I struggle even after 10 years of trying to learn it.
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Old 10-06-2018, 11:33 PM
Johndeere Johndeere is offline
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Wow not an easy task just trying to figure out if I should go Mac or Windows. Depending on what source you read each is better than the other. The one thing I have discovered is that going Mac is a little more expensive.

So I have to sort out which will wok for me. Interesting though that some people are using tablets.

The other issue is do I go Desk Top or Lap Top. From what I read the key choice is do you want to be mobile. I think I do so I am leaning towards a Lap Top..
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Old 10-07-2018, 03:24 PM
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Jim Jones Jim Jones is offline
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When I was first involved in home computers, it was at work on a Mac in the late 1980s. However, a little later, I opted for my own PC because it was an open system that allowed for more flexibility. Since there is little long-term difference in the capability of the two lines, whatever one is accustomed to is more important than the obscure advantages each may have over the other. There may be more programs available for PC, and some of the relatively obscure programs can have capabilities that are more useful than the leading ones. An example is Irfanview, not available for Macs. I use it more than all other image processing programs combined. It is extremely limited, but much image handling requires nothing more, and Irfanview (a free download) with all of its add-ons does that better than the bulky and slow mainline programs. There is much more tutoring available online and in books for programs like Photoshop. They need it. The next computer will probably come with Windows 10, although Windows 7 will be missed as it has served well.
I have little need for a laptop, and no experience owning one. The current desktop is a refurbished basic HP. Before that, a refurbished Dell. My first mainline computer was an IBM at $2000, many years ago. In between were a few other brands. Whatever refurb that is readily available at +/-$100 is good enough for what I do. Storing all data and image files on an external HD makes moving from computer to computer convenient. It also provides an opportunity for back-up. My 5tb Seagate has worked flawlessly for years. Keyboards are more important than computer brand names. I'm typing on a 28-year-old IBM, and have used similar IBMs for decades. New inexpensive keyboards are trash in comparison. Basic optical mice, like them, are cheap and disposable.
The monitor is an inexpensive 11.5"x20.7" Sanyo from Walmart. My computer eyeglasses focus at 16 inches, which seems about right for this screen. For decades I've found Sanyo products to be reliable. In comparison, Sony is a four letter word that begins with S, which is appropriate. Over decades I've found many Sony products to be inferior.
I often use Photoshop elements 7. I did have a late version, but took it off to give to a friend and reverted to version 7, which does almost everything needed. For 16 bit processing, there is Photoshop CS6, but I haven't learned to make the most of it. It's good to keep programs, files, and one's head out of the clouds.
For organizing files, I use my own system. For example, downloads from a camera are named by date (YYMMDD). This way they are listed chronologically. In addition, a file catalog devotes one line to list all subjects in each file. Searching that file with a word processor points to each incidence of a subject.
I replaced a perfectly good Epson 2400 scanner with an Epson V700 in hopes that it would be significantly better. It wasn't. However, the 2400 may not be supported by new operating systems.
I do a lot of printing. An Epson 2800 lasted maybe 6 years and well over 6000 prints before failing. The problem may have been head strikes due to heavy photo paper not being flat before loading. The current Epson P800 is even better, but so far has perhaps made merely a little over 1000 prints. Wilhelm Research Institute (wilhelm-research.com) has been testing imaging products for decades. Anyone concerned with print life should look up printers, papers, and inks there. I use Epson paper and ink. Printing at home insures quality, important for a few big prints.
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Old 10-08-2018, 12:56 AM
Johndeere Johndeere is offline
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Cool info Jim.

As you probably figured out with me printing is not a factor. I simply don't print, may be some day. Cant bs bothered and never liked the quality in home printing. But that's me.


Currently I used a external hard drive for storage. I have my own system but my actual digital files from my DSLR have over taxed my system. I am much more organized with my negative and slide scans. Don't ask why because I don't have an answer.

The most important to me will be the scanning. This rules out any flatbeds which I currently use. Don't be surprised if I go into 5 figures to get what works best.

But first I have to decide on the system and desktop or laptop. What I did notice with my research is that most dedicated photographers use a MAC.

Thank you for your input I appreciate it very much. You have a good point with me sticking to what I know best, Windows.
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Old 10-08-2018, 12:42 PM
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Jim Jones Jim Jones is offline
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Some inexpensive home color printers may not meet your standards, but Epson and Canon top printers should. My Epson P800 cost $900 after rebate and handles up to 17x22 paper. The prints have long life and a variety of paper is available from Epson. Some people recommend other non-Epson papers. In addition to costing as much as commercially produced prints, there is the space required, the bother of printing, and perhaps keeping a supply of ink and paper on hand. I never dreamed I would be making so many prints until having a quality printer of my own.

Flatbed scanners suffice for scanning 35mm film for much posting online, but little else. One rule of thumb is they can enlarge film maybe 5X. They do fine for 4x5 film. I'm working on a system of using a 24mpx camera to copy 35mm negatives and slides. It may not be much better than the Epson flatbed, but will be a lot faster.
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