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Old 01-16-2007, 06:44 PM
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Default Tips from the "Chimps"

Tips from our own "Chimps" Composed from http://www.photochimps.com/vb/showthread.php?t=3382

* I learned that composition is over 3/4's of the photograph. Rule of 3rd's rule...But RULES are made to be broken...in some cases - learn the rules first, then break them ... - Todd (aka - Ajazzyone)

* For a new photographer i'd say learn about composition then come back and ask me again. - Beth (aka -c8h10n40)

* Composition is the strongest way of seeing a subject. Making rules of composition to fit all subjects is like making one size and style of clothing to fit all men and women. - Jim Jones

* One common mistake is not checking the background closely. A poor background has ruined countless photos. Sometimes repositioning the subject is a cure. Sometimes a change in camera position helps. We often shoot from eye level. Always consider a lower position. Also, a higher position can lift a distracting horizon out of the picture. - Jim Jones

* Proper exposure and focus eliminate many problems. The more problems that are solved before the shutter is clicked, the better the image can be. Fixing the problems in Photoshop instead of doing the shot right doesn't work as well. - Jim Jones

* Is to make sure you keep all of your paperwork in order. That means all permits, model releases, tax forms, receipts... everything. - Koa (aka Boriken Warrior)

* I think that one thing that I've tried to teach others is to focus and recompose. You know, the rule of thirds. And another is to get in close. Nothing worse than a picture of a person in the center of the picture with lots and lots of empty boring space around them. - Tom

* Let's not get into the megapixel thing. (One of my most bothering topics). I shot 80 sessions last year with an old 4mp Olympus E-10. I got stunning 11X14 prints from that thing. Now, in it's day, it was considered a pro body and perhaps you're referring to a point and shoot. I hate the megapixel hype. For a portrait photographer you can 'get by' with 4 or more. Just my thoughts.. - Matt

* Probably the only "one thing" I would try to impress upon a newbie photographer would be practice, practice, practice. I believe there are so many other things to be learned that it is virtually impossible to select only one, as if it by itself would be the key to photographic enlightenment. - RBSinto

* Take LOTS of pics! MOVE!!! change possitions, look for different perspectives. Get down low, get close... - Wolfy

* Learn how to control, or work with these three things well: composition, depth of field, and light (...it's all about the light, dummy) ...and you will create wonders. - Fred (aka Chaud)

* I have had several very sad experiences when getting ready for an assignment, packing a big photo bag and then when at place realizing that the most important something is missing (film, when there was film, a tripod shoe without which a tripod is a simple piece of iron, the most needed lens and what not). The thing that should not be missed is checking lens - there may be water drops, finger smears. - Valery.

* Learn your camera. Yes, composition is important, but concentrating on composition is better done when you can operate your camera instinctively. - Sergio

* If someone has a point n shoot disposable camera, my advice is to move closer to the subject/s when taking pictures and be creative with composition. ( already mentioned but that's also my honest opinion )... - ed (aka SST_Defiant^ED^)
* Start with a fix focal lens and learn to move around your subject. Zoom lenses tend to keep the photographer stationary, moving the lens in and out rather than themselves around the subject. - Phil (aka The Rookie)

* You should be able to look at your work and determine what you may or may not like about it, and what to do/try the next time. If you can find a subject that inspires you take lots of pictures, and don't forget photography is subjective. If it's for you take pictures you like. If it's for clients take pictures HE/SHE want. - OC Native

* I'm doing two 'cause one's sort of a "ditto."
1: Move the camera. 2: Always use a lens shade. It will never do anything bad and will do many things good. - Cosmostrator

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