Photochimps.com

Go Back   Photochimps.com the Photo Site for Photographers of All Skill Levels > Photography Discussions > Film Photography
Home FAQ's of PC Forums Gallery Contests Members List


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-25-2018, 04:26 AM
Johndeere Johndeere is offline
Senior Member

 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,722
Default Why Use Film?

I think that is a fair question today. I could go on to cover all the advantages of digital and just close this discussion on those merits alone.

But of course that would be a wrong approach.

First of all film is fun, film is exciting and most of all it has a magical feel to it. By now you know I am a great film supporter. So what I am going to talk about is why I like film. I'm not going to talk about processing or printing. Some people may enjoy the processing end but for now I'm going to eliminate this part of the equation.

When shooting film there are still so many options to explore and discover. The two main ingredients is the camera and the film. You can't get much basic than this.

You have alot of options just in the camera. I'm certain there are so many it will make you go crazy. Do you go 35, medium or large format. Do you decide on a point and shoot, slr box, trl, view, press, plastic and the list can go on.

Do you want full auto control or one that is all hands on for every imput.?

What you will find there is a camera for everyone just based on your personal needs. Most important you can get a hold of some great equipment for pennies on the dollar.

Now there is the lovely stuff we call film. Each has it own unique qualities. Do you like the standard look of black and white. Maybe color prints is your calling or the stunning look of projecting slides. You may like fine grain or enjoy the look of grain in your film. You may like muted colors or high saturation. I know you will find the different emulsions between the manufactures an interesting road to your personal taste.

These are just the surface reasons to find film, again and shot it.
__________________
3-9-2004 official date
2007 official date of death
3-2012 a new beginning
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-25-2018, 03:15 PM
Jim Jones's Avatar
Jim Jones Jim Jones is offline
"Ye ole' wise one" & Contributor

 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Chillicothe, Missouri
Posts: 4,962
Default

There also were a variety of films that captured some subjects better than most digital cameras. Three classic Kodak films (now discontinued) were Kodachrome, High Speed Infrared (especially in sheet film), and Tech Pan. Just this week some nieces were commenting on how magnificent Kodachrome projected onto a good screen was many decades ago. Only recently have large screen TVs and high resolution digital cameras perhaps caught up with that.

There is the total involvement in film that some of us know. I belong to a camera club where too many members send their digital files out for printing. This can be severely limiting when one wants the best possible finished images. When Kodachrome was king, we had to get everything right in the camera: no darkroom salvaging, no Photoshop. Training for that serves us well in the digital age.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-25-2018, 03:37 PM
Johndeere Johndeere is offline
Senior Member

 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,722
Default

Let's talk a little about film. I will keep it simple and divide it in three common types. Black and White, Color Negative and Color Reversal.

I should note that black and white film is also a negative film. Color reversal is also called slide film.

Film is rated to the sensitivity it has to light. For example a film rated at iso 50 would be less sensitive to light than a iso 800 rated film. Generally a slower rated film would have less grain than a higher rated film. Most people though in my opinion would not notice.

A negative film can handle a broader range of exposure than a slide film. What does this mean? Let's say you have different levels of light in you subject. Let's call these levels 1, 2 and 3. So you take an exposure reading for 2. A negative film can give you good results for all three ranges. Now using a slide film for the same reading and 1 and 3 can be under exposed or over exposed. This is just a simple explanation of how it would work. However I think this explanation gives you a good idea of the range differences between them.

So when would you use a fast film and a slow Film? This answer is not so simple because there are a lot of factors that can change the possibilities. However for a simple explanation I will give you some examples. If I am shooting an action or fast moving subject I like to use a fast rated film such as a 400 or 800. If im shooting a portrait I like to use a slower rated film such as 200 or lower.

Now these are not rules. Also there are many variables that come into play. I will start to cover some of these later. It isn't over complicated but in addition to using your film choice you have to learn or understand how the shutter speed and lenses aperture combined with other factors such as light all come into play.

Are you starting to understand? Honestly it isn't hard to shoot film and in fact the same information is used for digital. You get grain with film and noise with digital. Everything works the same no matter what.
__________________
3-9-2004 official date
2007 official date of death
3-2012 a new beginning
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-25-2018, 03:48 PM
Johndeere Johndeere is offline
Senior Member

 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,722
Default

Hey Jim I hope you had a great holiday. Jim is one of the best photography resources I know of. We have something in common as we are both fans of Kodak TP. I am down to my last roll. I also like Fuji 100 Acros another film that is being discontinued.

Jim feel free to add to my conversation or correct anything I miss. I will note that both of us like film and digital though Jim is a far greater resource when it comes to medium or large format film.

In addition he had the advantage of using a lot more different films, sadly being a little younger these films were gone by the time I got into photography. Bottom line Jim is very knowledgeable across broader range than I am.
__________________
3-9-2004 official date
2007 official date of death
3-2012 a new beginning
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-25-2018, 03:54 PM
Johndeere Johndeere is offline
Senior Member

 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,722
Default

My last roll.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 20181125_105303.jpg (45.2 KB, 2 views)
__________________
3-9-2004 official date
2007 official date of death
3-2012 a new beginning
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-26-2018, 03:10 PM
Jim Jones's Avatar
Jim Jones Jim Jones is offline
"Ye ole' wise one" & Contributor

 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Chillicothe, Missouri
Posts: 4,962
Default

Somewhere I should have part of a long roll of Tech Pan. I'm saving it for perhaps a few technical uses, not just picture making. From time to time somewhat similar films appear overseas, but I haven't tried or researched them. Litho film can do some of the things TP could, although it is not panchromatic. It is usually thinner than TP and contrastier when developed in the proper developer. I just used Dektol. Both films solarize nicely. I never mastered solarization well enough to get it right without wasting some film. The thunderhead was shot on TP with a deep red filter. The sky was darkened somewhat in post processing.

Kodak High Speed Infrared in sheet film was perhaps the best of IR films. Again, I haven't tried the current IR films from overseas. High Speed Infrared was quite grainy, which wasn't the problem in sheet film as in 35mm. It was sensitized down to 800nm, deeper into the IR range than most current IR films. With a 25A red filter, deep blue skies can appear almost black. Rather than try whatever IR films are now available, I bought a used DSLR online that had been converted to IR. This eliminates the bother of using deep red filters with the necessarily slower shutter speeds. Most camera lenses were not designed for IR photography. Some work well enough, some less so.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Polo015a.jpg (174.3 KB, 2 views)

Last edited by Jim Jones; 11-26-2018 at 03:13 PM..
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.