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Old 10-08-2018, 02:44 PM
Johndeere Johndeere is offline
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Default Film some times I feel it's a battle

Digital is here and I don't even call it the future I call it the norm. I am fully digital though lacking on the processing end.

Film is what I love. I'm not going to say it produces a better image or anything subjective like that. I have my reason why I love film and they are personal and that works for me.

However it has been a challenge. Film stock comes and goes but mainly goes. I have lost a lot of my favorites from TP to Plus X and soon to be Acros 100. The list can go on with color film and slide film. I can expand the list with paper and much more.

So for me it has been a challenge to keep a strong interest in film. I just placed a large order for Acros 100. I suspect this will be the last time I will be able to really get the amount I want. I have used all my TP film and I'm down to my last few rolls of Plus X.

Don't get me wrong there really is a decent amount of choices in black and white but when you loose your favorites it start to take a toll on your interest in film.

I am excited to have another choice with Kodak bringing back a favorite slide film but worry Fuji may stop production of some of my other favorites.

To me film really has not made a come back. If anything it is making what I see as its last gasp for air to prevent itself from fading in to history.

Everything has a life span. The world will move on and develop more exciting advancements in photography.

These past 15 years have been fun as digital and film fought for the right to become the leader. We all knew the more modern technology would win as it always does. I just think the next 15 year will no be so kind for us that still love working with film.

However I plan to enjoy working with film as long as I can and I will just have to learn to deal with what will become an even faster change in film products.
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Old 10-09-2018, 12:24 AM
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Jim Jones Jim Jones is offline
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There are several dramatic changes in film and cameras in my lifetime. The camera which made 35mm film practical was the Leica, first marketed in about 1925 (even before my time). Perhaps the first 35mm SLR was the Praktica in the early 30s. Competition from this newcomer probably provoked Leica into making reflex adaptors for their RF cameras, although these were expensive, awkward, and weren't useable with normal and wide angle lenses. The versatility of the SLR gradually pushed RF cameras to the sidelines. Then came the first primitive digital cameras, logically followed by the DSLR. I predict that the mirrorless cameras will largely displace the DSLR in the next ten years. Automatic exposure is another field that has made great progress from Kodak's first basic auto exposure camera in 1935.

Advances in film aren't so spectacular. Autochrome was marketed in the very early 1900s. It was Kocachrome in 1935 that made color photography available to many, followed by Kodacolor in a few years. When I first used 35mm, Kodachrome was rated at ASA10 and the fastest B&W film was Tri-X at ASA 200, later raised to 400. Kodak marketed 2475 Recording Film around 1960, optimistically rated at 1600 and terribly grainy. I shot my last football game with a DSLR and up to ISO 12800. It may have been almost as grainy as 2475 recording film, but it was color!
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Old 10-09-2018, 12:36 AM
Johndeere Johndeere is offline
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Your just old, lol just joking. I remember the family camera being a very cheap twin reflex. Then my dad moved up to a Polaroid. However my parents were not a big photo family. They didn't have the money so photos were only taken for rare special occasions.

Funny how photography was to expensive back in the late 1960`s into the mid 1970's.
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Old 10-09-2018, 12:48 PM
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Jim Jones Jim Jones is offline
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At one time Kodachrome cost about seven cents per shot, and while overseas it was a long time to get them back. On the other hand, during a World's Fair on the east coast, we could drop Kodachrome off in the afternoon at the fair and pick up the slides next day.

All new technology is expensive. The best phonographs in the 1920s cost almost as much as a Model T. While box cameras were as cheap as one dollar, the best folding Kodaks a hundred years ago cost almost a hundred when factory workers made maybe three or five a day, and farm hands much less.
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