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  #1  
Old 11-19-2006, 01:39 AM
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Unhappy What is ONE thing....

Through your years of photography. What is one or two of the most valuable things you've learned that someone else can benefit from? This could be for a beginner or veteran photographer that wants be become a better photographer.

For me, I learned that composition is over 3/4's of the photograph. Rule of 3rd's rule...But RULES are made to be broken...in some cases...

I've told beginners that ALWAYS come up to me at my shows. How can I make myself/son/daughter a better photographer? We'll thats a loaded question. I always tell them First things first...composition. I have seen the best pictures taken with a P&S camera and some horrible pictures taken with an expensive camera. EDIT: With a cheap P&S camera, you are limited to what you can do.

I can come up with tons of comments....

I am sure other people have come up to you and say the same...What are some of your comments to them?
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Old 11-19-2006, 01:49 AM
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Spend tons of money on equipment. Nobody has ever made a good photograph with less than 10 megapixels.

As long as you have an interesting subject the quality of the light is not important.

Don't worry about things like keeping track of exposure readings and making appropriate adjustments, just keep shootin' eventually you will get lucky.
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Old 11-19-2006, 02:31 AM
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i usually tell wannabes that photoshop can fix anything. but not elements, only 7 or above will work.. then when they find out the price they quit bothering me. i'm referring to those people who buy a 3mp camera and want to know all of my secrets so they can take pictures like mine (even though they've only seen my landscape shots) tomorrow at their family reunion..

for a new photographer i'd say learn about composition then come back and ask me again.
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Old 11-19-2006, 06:55 AM
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Composition is the strongest way of seeing a subject. Making rules of composition to fit all subjects is like making one size and style of clothing to fit all men and women.

The quality of light IS important. Think not? Consider how awful most shots with only on-camera flash look.

One common mistake is not checking the background closely. A poor background has ruined countless photos. Sometimes repositioning the subject is a cure. Sometimes a change in camera position helps. We often shoot from eye level. Always consider a lower position. Also, a higher position can lift a distracting horizon out of the picture.

Better equipment sometimes helps, but many great photos have been made with primative cameras. Photographers like Edward Weston didn't know what a megapixel was.

Proper exposure and focus eliminate many problems. The more problems that are solved before the shutter is clicked, the better the image can be. Fixing the problems in Photoshop instead of doing the shot right doesn't work as well.
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Old 11-19-2006, 01:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jim Jones@Nov 19 2006, 01:55 AM
*

The quality of light IS important.* Think not?* Consider how awful most shots with only on-camera flash look.*

[snapback]24403[/snapback]
I know Jim, that stuff dripping off of my comment was sarcasim.
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Old 11-19-2006, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by jasonh@Nov 19 2006, 07:39 AM
I know Jim,* that stuff dripping off of my comment was sarcasim.
[snapback]24411[/snapback]
I know, but there might be people visiting Photochimps that don't realize that we can have almost as much fun joking about photography as by making photos.
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Old 11-19-2006, 08:42 PM
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It's not the size of your equipment but how you paddle the boat with it
that counts.

Yeah, can be applied to your "photo" equipment as well. Sheesh!

The best wisdon I can give, considering what happened to me this year, is to make sure you keep all of your paperwork in order. That means all permits, model releases, tax forms, receipts... everything.

No matter how good your photography, mess up on any one of those things and your boat is sunk, no matter how large your "paddle" may be.

-Koa-
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Old 11-19-2006, 10:26 PM
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I think that one thing that I've tried to teach others is to focus and recompose. You know, the rule of thirds. And another is to get in close. Nothing worse than a picture of a person in the center of the picture with lots and lots of empty boring space around them.
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Old 11-20-2006, 01:16 AM
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Let's not get into the megapixel thing. (One of my most bothering topics). I shot 80 sessions last year with an old 4mp Olympus E-10. I got stunning 11X14 prints from that thing.

Now, in it's day, it was considered a pro body and perhaps you're referring to a point and shoot. I hate the megapixel hype. For a portrait photographer you can 'get by' with 4 or more. Just my thoughts.
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Old 11-20-2006, 04:27 PM
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Probably the only "one thing" I would try to impress upon a newbie photographer would be practice, practice, practice. I believe there are so many other things to be learned that it is virtually impossible to select only one, as if it by itself would be the key to photographic enlightenment.
I've been doing this for almost thirty years, and continue to learn every time I shoot.
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