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-   -   Any way to save? (http://www.photochimps.com/vb/showthread.php?t=7564)

winger 05-06-2014 04:28 AM

Any way to save?
 
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So I'd had this old roll of film (Agfa 1000RS slide film) sitting around for awhile and figured I might as well put it in a camera and see what comes out. Well, not much. And none of the shots are anything that matter too much, thankfully. There are two shots of our now departed German Shepherd, but I do have a bunch of decent ones of her on digital.
Anyway, the film scans as being extremely blue - more than it looks. I think underwater shots are less blue. I can tweak it a little in the scanning process, but it isn't a huge help. What's my best bet for getting the blue cast out?
And talk about great balls of grain! It's grainier than 2 years expired HIE (BTDT). Is there a way to do some smoothing that leaves a little detail?
I'm looking at this mainly as a way to learn some more pp techniques, not like I'm really going to save the images and have them look "normal."

Jim Jones 05-06-2014 12:40 PM

A quality 48 bit scan would give you the most information to tweek, but not enough to make it look nearly normal. It might be easier to accentuate the deficiencies and make it a very graphic nearly abstract image, with posterized colors and grain with sharp edges and contrast instead of mush.

Johndeere 07-09-2014 04:50 AM

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This is a hard one and even though it was late I wanted to see with my limited abilities what I could do. Well if you stand like 10 feet away from the screen it looks better. Ok so I will not win any awards with it but I tired.

winger 07-10-2014 12:36 AM

Thanks, John! Yeah, this one was pretty far gone. Your version is closer to a cyanotype shade of blue - I like it.

Jim Jones 07-10-2014 01:54 PM

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Rather than trying to restore such an image, making the most of its defects may be better. The artifacts induced by JPG compression bother me more than the condition of the original film.

Johndeere 07-10-2014 08:27 PM

Black and white is to easy. More challenging to try to do it in color for the fun of it.

As my daughter says all the time screw up then change it to black and white and every thing is good.

winger 07-11-2014 01:33 PM

B&W is almost always good to me. :) Maybe I'll have a chance to revisit this one soon and try something different. We also just got a bunch of digital files from Ken's latest change of command and there are several that are very blue (very similar to this one). I know they were shot on a dSLR, so I don't know what the photographer did, but I get to try and fix them.

bernabeu 10-08-2017 02:42 PM

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I like Microsoft Digital Image Pro for quick fixes.
Would look good printed on canvas.
Feel free to email me a larger file for a better 'on the house' fix.


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